Long Jump

Jamie Segerson
Lauren Wiltshire
Stephen Yaros
Allison Schultz

1st Hour

We tested long jump. We tested different starting distances from the board, which resulted in different accelerations and jump forces. We analyzed the acceleration and the force of the jump for each trial.

Procedure:
Our main goal is to test different variations in acceleration and height from the long jump board in long jump. To do this, we would need a video camera as well as a specific way to measure accelerations and a tool to measure height. We are going to test the distance of the jump compared to the force of the push off on the board. We will be using the force plate to test the force of the jump and we will be using an accelerometer to test the accelerations of the jumper at different points on the runway.
 
Graph Analysis:
Two graphs were obtained from each of the three trials, one measuring acceleration over time and one measuring force. According to the graphs, as acceleration increases, so does the resulting force of the jump. For example, in the first trial, acceleration was approximately 54m/s2 and the force was almost 2000 N. In the second trial, acceleration was almost 56m/s2 and the resulting force was around 2200 N. Finally, in the third trial, acceleration was close to 59m/s2 and the force was around 2500 N. So our data supports the equation F=ma: if mass remains constant, then greater acceleration will result in greater force.

Mass:
1 pound = 0.45 kilograms
200 pounds x 0.45 = 90.72 kilograms

Three Steps (T3, Steve three step analyzed):
Impulse = Force x Time
Impulse = 2545 N x 0.02 sec
Impulse = 50.9 N x s

Momentum = Mass x Velocity
Momentum = 90.72 kg x 4.2 m/s (approximate)
Momentum = 381.02 kgm/s

Work = Force x Distance
Work = 2545 N x 3.73 m
Work = 9492.85 N

We only took a video of the three step approach for long jump, but this data is consistent with the trends of the one and two step approaches.
The data from these two approaches would be consistent with the numbers from the three step approach.
 
Conclusion: Through our research we confirmed that more running distance results in a greater velocity. this greater velocity creates greater momentum which makes the jumper put a greater force on the board which results in a farther jump. The experiment was pretty straight forward so we didn't really encounter any problems. We also had tons of fun!!!
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